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in the fighter wing. i was there will not place blew up. i don't think any of us were thinking of terrorism than the way it is now. we were not prepared to fight to we were brought up to fight to the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter what is going on with russia? it is a soviet union. what is that? it was of big things back then before toppled most of us had never considered iraq of saddam hussein but winning was a foregone conclusion and terrorism took us by subplot -- surprise. we thought they were rabble rouser is. the bin laden construction company how is that for irony? >> but after that things change with the world trade center bombing and september september 11th i was flying that morning. coming in from another rotation and september 10th was our first day back. essentially flying and i had come down nearly and somebody said you have to look at this. i thought what moron of the pilot could hit the tower of that size on a clear day? i thought it was an accident. then the second plane hit they sent us up to close down the airspace of the united states. that is eerie as the pilot. "
on the battlefield. and they are held under the law of war because we don't want to let them go back to killing us, and they are not given a lawyer because we're not trying to solve a crime, we're trying to win a war. and here's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were put in military custody because we were all afraid and they looked like the enemy. that was not a high point in america. what are we talking about here? we're talking about detaining people under the law of war who are suspected of joining al qaeda of the taliban in engaging in a belligerent act against the united states. now, i want to make the record clear that some of my colleagues on the republican side have been trying to deny law of war detention to the obama administration, and they have openly said this. if you allow t
new jerseyersey. congressmen this is congressman frank pallone. congressman, thanks for joining us as you go ahead with your recovery efforts there and new jersey our last caller brought up some concern about being able to vote on tuesday after the damage frot the storm.aller brout up a is that going to be a problem ia blljersey? >> guest: wellguest: it may be n the sense of people being able to access a polling place. now, every authority whether it is the governor or the county clerk's -- they assured us that there will be places to vote. but if we have places to vote that are significantly distant from where people traditionally do vote, or where there is an access problem -- that does pose a problem. we have to make sure that there is a polling place that is operational, and in a reasonable location for people to vote. you cannot tell people that are in one town that they have got to go to another town to vote. first of all, many of them will not have transportation and you cannot even get gas for the most part. it is a concerned. the concern is real. we have got to make sure t
-- there are so many things that are on the brink of taking us on the disaster not the least of them being the possibility of cyber warfare. that's something that television news ought to be covering big time right now. i am tremendously concerned by the fact that the american public and its military have never been as far apart as they are right now. a terrific job of covering everyone in uniform and hero. we did a terrific job of welcoming them at airports saying thank you for your service. we know nothing about what's going on in the military and for what's more, the military operations these days are being launched on the basis of drone attacks, cia operatives, special operations forces out in the field, and all of that backed by civilian employees, civilian contractors, and we know next to nothing that is brought by these. islamic because the reporting is not being done? >> it's because we found that keeping the american public won't stand for a draft and the professional military wasn't enough to fight all over the world else we are now -- we've been focused on afghanistan we actuall
rights all the time. in our state i want to have honest, fair elections. if you are not u.s. citizen you don't have the right to vote in our state. there was a federal database called save our homeland security we asked for that we as taxpayers paid for the we have a right to end it -- that wouldn't give it to us so we ended up in a lawsuit and we won. we won because we are on the right side. we have to look at every day about our own state sovereignty and what our own rights are. goes back to the alexander hamilton quote. for all of us is individuals weathered is economic freedom or just freedom to live our lives the way we want to we have got to focus on states rights because if we don't and the federal government will run everything about our lives. let me thank you for the opportunity to be here, thank you for what you do every day. have a great day. >> the u.s. constitution and to screen court republican senator mike lee of utah and ted crews of texas. this is about an hour. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. our mid afternoon session. good afternoon. my name is leonard leo an
people were very strategic in their use of their resources. and they had a lot. obama raised about a billion dollars. they were very strategic. obama's campaign can buy a television advertisement at the lowest rate possible, whereas the television stations, local television stations that are selling that want to make as much money as possible and they don't have to offer low rate to the super pacs. they can charge the super pac as much as the market will bear and in fact because of the saturation, and they in fact did say that many were paying 10 or 15 times more for 30 seconds in the obama campaign was. so i don't want to say that -- it would be satisfying to say money didn't have any effect, so despite the billions that report and the people trying to manipulate elections or even worse, another aspect of the citizens united campaign was an employer received both the sample ballot to his workers paychecks. so they would get an idea of how you wanted them to vote. there were a lot of employers who did that. but romney encouraged employers to do that. in terms of citizens united, fi
address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector refo
part of the historic results of this last week where he had 20 women in the u.s. senate, and historic number and rebecca rightly reminded us that it was in part because of things like emily's list that i want to have a conversation about the kind of institutions and the organizations that have been working quiet they all this time to make this moment possible. i don't have to say something about emily's list. >> families list within washington politics, it is an incredibly powerful force. at some point they were the largest organization. i don't know if that's still true, in the day of the super pacs, they are not the largest anybody. so emily's list is an organization that supports democratic pro-choice women for all kinds of offices around the country. they are very powerful and have been working really hard for a long time to get more women effect did. other celebration about the creator of the woman, sometimes you want to say this is terrific progress in other times you say wow, 20%. but it's very, very work getting women elected. so i cited emily's list because they're the bigge
in the hands of our grandchildren? or am i going to step up and lead? i used to get criticized because i was a deal maker. i talked to people like joe lieberman, we would find a way to get things done. you have to give a little to get a little. doesn't wind up getting you in trouble? oh, yes. but after all, that is what this is all about. the president has said himself, and i quoted him in an article that may run in the "washington post" tomorrow, he says america deserves better. it begins with him. mcconnell has to be engaged. harry reid has to be engaged. we are at a profit this year. maybe it is the fiscal cliff. but we have to act on a lot of really serious things and we had some of it now. we have to do a lot of it next year. if they do the right thing, that our country will benefit the legacy will be secure. so i want to open this up. a lot of people in this room are engaged in this effort, frankly in a more activist way and ceos have been engaged in anything like this in a long time. i would like to hear from some of them. before i do that, i would like to ask you a question about
that companies-x% parental consent for the use of tracking, you know, of children, on behavior. which is actually difficult to implement. and a lot of industry has been very vocal about, concerns about this. i just wanted to check where that stands. is that also going to be done by the end of the year? >> that is something fortunately we have some control over. it is an update the childrens online privacy protection act. it is rule making and we're looking at all the comments that came in and sort of weighing, weighing how to tweak the regulation and we'll finish it up by the end of the year i'm pretty sure. julia, i don't think it is as controversial as you suggested. >> everything is controversial in my view. that is what is so interesting. one of the most compelling criticisms i heard of cop pa -- copa. it disincentivizes children's cone tent because he have to get consent. as a parent i don't feel there are november places where i can feel safe for my children going online. what do you have to say for that argument? >> look, i would say, we're talking first of all, we're talking about very vu
is hurting u.s. foreign policy objectives. and asian policy is a good place to rebuild i partisanship to the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon, and welcome to georgetown university. we've come together today for a special conversation, a conversation between top diplomats, past and present, each of whom has played a significant role in u.s. asia relations over the past two decades. with representatives from the administrations of george h. w. bush through the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offer their expertise and experience as a look back on the use of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. wish to offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school of foreign service, and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our countries most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to doctor victor cha a professor in government and asian studies and director of asian studies here in georgetown. carol lancaster, o
started. this is live coverage running just a few minutes late. again, a reminder you can follow us on facebook and facebook.com/booktv and we have exclusive updates and author interviews, et cetera on her facebook page. just waiting for mr. patterson. this should be to shortly ensure that coverage of the miami book fair international 29th year. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon. please take your seats. we are about to begin the session. thank you so much. i am marilou harrison and many of you have heard from me because he been in this room yesterday and today. i served as a volunteer here, a very proud: tiered of miami book fair international candidate to recognize is that done before, all of the volunteers come to thousands of volunteers for miami dade college as well as the community who come together reach you to think this book fair take place. i'd also like to recognize those who are fri
who mentioned this to me as us going out the door last night, we had three major house special elections over the last couple of years. one in pennsylvania, mark critz one that when. one in new york when chris lee, he is sending videos or photographs of his shortlist top left office in upstate new york, was replaced by the democrat kathy hogle. and the third, when arizona seat open up after congressman giffords stepped down after the horrible shooting. she was replaced by congressman barber. the democrats won all three of those special elections, and each and every case they said they won because of medicare. did somebody say medicare? at what was, medicare. and then what the democrats had was, and we're going to use that as a template for winning in the twinkling election. didn't work at the congressional -- 2012 election. women look at the exit polls and we see why people voted and how they voted, sometimes it's not so civil. the exit polls have some very strange results. i'll get into a couple of these. is the country had in the right direction or sears off on the wrong trac
states. for people in the room understand the president as well as us and golsby. people ask what is going to come of this fiscal cliff. i'd like to look through the fiscal cliff asking you to describe to us how do you see the budget negotiations playing out over the next six months? >> well, feels to me like they almost had a deal last year. the principle bottleneck last year was not that the president was unwilling to offer cuts. it was that there was a group of republicans in the house who wouldn't go for the revenue, and i think that's still the bottleneck now. you probably saw the article this morning from hubbard, what boehner said, and i take from this collection some optimism in 20 # 13 the way it might play out is whether we go over or don't go over the fiscal cliff, you know, there's a lot to happen in the next three months, that we get to some space where if they did a trillion dollars of cuts and reforms to entitlements, a frl on discretionary, a trillion in new revenue, a trillion in saved interest only because the budget doesn't understand net present value, but that
to join us today. susan is the bureau chief of usa today where she writes about the white house and national policy and won a slew of awards for distinguished reporting on the presidency, but brandon smith memorial award for deadline reporting on the presidency and coverage of the presidency and a lot of other awards. use a regular guest hosts of the diane beam show on pbs and cnn and many other broadcast outlets. a native of wichita, kan. she received a bachelor's degree from northwest and journalism from columbia where she was a pulitzer fellow. she will be followed by vicki edwards to is electorate at princeton university's woodrow wilson school of public policy international affairs. .. great pleasure to be here with the four people for whom i have so much admiration and the wife quoted so much time and so many stories. i have i think a little bit of news which is i found out the title of the next book that is coming out between tom so you can figure out the 1992 book by renewing congress. it sounds pretty positive. 2000, the permanent campaign. okay maybe not entirely posit
out an electoral victory. we'd like to welcome everybody who's joining us now on c-span2. if you're on c-span 1, you have to switch over. if you had a friend that didn't switch over, run over there, pound on that door. you can join us at politico.com, there's an e-mail that will come directly to us onset. we're going to bring you into the conversation. it's 10:00, the polls have closed in most of the states that will determine the outcome of this election. i would say if you wanted to step back and where do we stand at 10:00 on election night, the big headline, the one headline we know for sure, joe donnelly won the senate seat for democrats in indiana, a huge and what unexpected victory for democrats, makes it almost impossible for republicans to win back the senate. we have declared long ago that the house will stay in republican hands, it now looks like the senate will stay in democratic hands. so it's all down to the presidential race about whether or not we have a status quo, divided government in washington. the early states that have been called are very much looking in ba
after all here today have. forgotten. fate looked down kindly on us when she chose neil to be the first to venture to another world. to have the opportunity to look back from space at the beauty of our own. it could have been another.ow it wasn't. it wasn't for a reason. no one, no one, but no one could have accepted the responsibility of his remarkable accomplishment with more dignity and more grace than neil armstrong. he embodied all that is good and all that is great about america. >>> more from the memorial service for neil armstrong thanksgiving day on c-span at 10 oom eastern and just before 11:30, a behind the scenes look at life as a teenager in the white house with susan ford baal and lyndon johnson rob, and after one, how scientists use game skills and theories to solve world problems. >>> a conversation with president obama's biographers after his re-election. hear from journalists ron suskind, author of "the confidence men: wall street, washington, and the education of a president." the atlantic, aspen institute, and the newseum hosted the forum. >> we have one titled "why
there was a real wine. i was afraid there would be a backlash and all of us were feeling. they were putting forth the same effort they put forward for years. the prejudices and they never really re-examine what it would mean to reconsider those tropes in those slightly shifted things. and so when you had todd akin, we'll really have to think a lot about, is that religious religion, or is it really deep and historical sense of oneness? my own little theory is that it became until recently, people like strom thurmond, the fact that so many white men, historically in this country pulled themselves that they were not the product of race and so this invisibility of the product of race is not the product of the women who must've really wanted them. otherwise it is -- it is very clear that some parts operate at a distance. >> i would also, speaking to your question about whether this is about action or reaction, and of course, i think it is all part of this so that everything is constant in action and reaction -- one thing i want to point to, i think when we talk about these kind of race comments on the
will be moderating the panel. the novelist will be joining us later. ms. kaplan will also be speaking, the founder of the miami book fair, introducing and opening the weekend coverage. in just a minute we'll take you now to chapman all. it's rather full. we will be beginning or coverage varies and. we are live on book tv. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. i had a little bit too much coffee is morning. it is a pleasure to see you. we are delighted to welcome you to the first session this saturday morning. how are you today. [applause] as you know, this is one of the most exciting times for us in the fall season in miami, and we are thrilled with this morning's panel. first and foremost, we would like to thank everyone who helped make this impossible, including our sponsors as well as blue florida and our volunteers. before we get started now would like to ask everyone to please turn of
doesn't have that skill set to use human nature as a way of getting done what he wants to get done in washington. >> host: holm books have you written? >> guest: i think this is my 11th book. three novels and eight nonfiction. >> host: what do you say to critics of your books? >> guest: what do the critics say. >> host: the accuracy of the stories you tell, et cetera. >> guest: well, the fact of the matter is, as far as i know, there hasn't been a single fact in this book that's been challenged in a kind of credible way. people have said, oh, klein makes things up. that's what kids in the schoolyard -- they call each other names. i've been called all kinds of names. but in fact when it comes to the credibility of my reporting, i don't think anybody has laid a glove on me yet. >> host: how many university were you editor. >> guest: 12 years assed debtor in chief of "new york times." and many of my. columns have been used by vanity fair, and all the books that have been excerpted, not a single nonfactual issue was wrong. >> host: you interviewed -- >> guest: we sat down for three hou
in this world than the u.s. military, to understand and think through all the secondary and tertiary, primary elements of a plan and how to execute it. so, leveraging that skill set and engaging with the appropriate authorities on how to respond to a health emergency, and how you would address these issues well before the incident occurs is probably the best solution. now, those teams probably exist to do that. but whether or not, it really depends on their maturity of that country and its ability to leverage very scarce resources. just like in the u.s., our health care professionals barely have enough time to address the day-to-day health care needs of the population, let alone planning for emergency. this is the challenge, but i think this is where the military and the u.s., in collaboration with its other federal partners, can be extraordinarily successful. >> in the back. i think we're probably just about running out of time, so the mic is behind you. core question. >> i'd like to refer back -- university of wisconsin republic referred back to ambassador hume's reference to the shipping i
in advance of a disaster? i think all of us agree with that. .. being that building relations with the people rising sow africa and the specifically aimed at building a capacity for administering hiv treatment in a country where the civilian authorities said they would never allow it. your point is well taken and sometimes there are opportunities to do that. >> of i can also. one of the most important ways to prevent is to do credible and reliable health surveillance. in many countries for which we have no strong visibility on the presence of infectious disease and with such a mobile world, undetected infectious diseases are a threat to us all. >> thank you. >> if you can see the hands better than i can, people with their hands up, position yourself and we will get the next time around. >> thank you for your presentation. as you know, there has been a debate about what health can contribute to security. there is agreement that health intervention and human security, and also the united states has a major role in humanitarian spots and that is not necessarily driven by national security consid
injuring himself into a program at walter reed what it ended up using acupuncture, using meditation, using other techniques to wean him off of all the drugs that he was on, and through this program he actually was able to walk out of walter reed on his own two feet. so, you know, i really commend the military for two things, for one, for allowing us to tell this story, both good and bad, but for recognizing this problem by recognizing that there is this problem of overmedication and that they are looking for outside the box ideas and how to fix it. i mean, that's sort of the whole thesis of the film really, the metaphor of "escape fire" is the status quo isn't working and we need to start looking for outside the box ideas. >> more with matthew heineman, producer and director of "escape fire," the fight to rescue america's health care. sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> live picture from the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c., a discussion just getting underway with political analysts and pollsters taking a look at the election numbers and examining a voter turnout and
"everything bad is good for you: how today's popular culture is actually making us smarter", he writes the great unsung story of our culture today is how many welcome trends are going up. anthony in san antonio, texas. you are on booktv with steven johnson. >> caller: good morning, mr. johnson. let me just say what a distinct pleasure it is to talk to you. i want to say in 2005, i was a counselor educator and i taught a continuing education class counselors throughout the san antonio community. believe me, i used your book, the looks were bewilderment and total aggravation. the title freak them out. learning is prefigured. the kids were teaching me. i didn't know anything about computers. how are we going to use it to guard against plagiarism? this had nothing to do with it. the resistance, as the time went on, and when i wrote my little blurb on amazon at 11 responses, only two people agreed with it. so this resistance among practitioners had to be tremendous. when the little kid wrote the iphone initiative about two or three years ago, and i played that in one of my classes, the ones
are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: yes i would first like to congratulate the american people on using good sense by reelecting a president. mr. romney had no plans. he was just offering the opposite of what the president was presenting to the american people. have no plan for anything. i don't know how anybody in his position could get as far as he did with nothing to offer the american people. the other thing -- i just don't understand how with the american people would think to even consider him as the presidential candidate. he had absolutely nothing to offer. everything he offered was nonexistent or i will just do the president isn't doing. >> host: but the ask you, you sound like you're passionately supportive of the president. >> caller: i'm passionate for the country. i don't care who obama our romney is. i want somebody that will help the american people to progress. i want to see america -- >> host: you want compromise? >> caller: i want compromise, yes. but i'm going to tell you this, and make no mistake about it, we have people in this country that have completely destroyed rath
. truly courageous and is willing to use her satirical highlights for issues of the day describes itself as the polemicist to likes to stir the pot and does not pretend to be impartial or about list. her background has prepared her well as a lawyer and graduated with honors from cornell, graduate of michigan and what school and author of eight new times bestsellers the ladies of the few are the only ones that have not read your book. and "mugged" racial demagoguery from the seventies to obama" i encourage your ready-to-eat it. i felt so on burgeoned and liberated i will get his rid of those bottled words. >> lazy, angry, constitution, e xperienced, holding down the fort, peanut butter, community organizer, the black hole and apartment and black share. i know i am not role i will say the most restatement that seems to be by the courage to view please forgive me they can most think of i am not voting for president obama. [applause] i feel better. say that to the person next you as well. all joking aside to bear huge tax on the aside they can say very toxic comments and not be held to the s
months as i said, and he ended up injurying himself into an innovative program using acupuncture and meditation and other techniques to wean him off all the drugs he was on, and through this program, he actually was able to walk out of walter reid on his own two feet so, you know, i really commend the military for two things, for, one, allowing us to tell this story, both the good and the bad, but for recognizing this problem, by recognizing that there is this problem of over medication, and that they are looking for outside the block ideas on how to fix it. i mean, that's sort of the whole thesis of the film, really, the metaphor of the "escape fire" that the status quo is not working, and we have to look for outside the box ideas. >> more with the producer and directser of "escape fire" the fight to rescue america's health care sunday night at eight on c-span's "q&a." >> coverage continues with a forum hosted by the strategy firm laslow strategies. you'll hear from greenberg and ralph reed from the faith and freedom coalition. up first, the white house communications director,
much and may be have other vices that could have an impact, but, you know, tables don't help us very much. there's a good chance that in the next four years, there's one, two, or three vacancies. some depends on when they emerge. if you have a 55-45 democratic senate, and there's a vacancy, barack obama has a little more leeway to pick somebody with a stronger ideological edge than if it's it a 51-49 senate or one that goes the other way. i think your much more likely in any event to get somebody who would be somewhere in the broad center of legal discourse, and there are a lot of operations -- options out there. in many ways, more interesting, is the impact that we'll see now with obama having four years, and maybe a little bit more of an understanding curious that he didn't have it as a constitutional law professor, of the importance of putting forward nominees for appeals courts and district courts. he was really slow in moving to that through his first couple of years, and there's a lot of vacancies there. now he's got opportunities to fill the vacancies, and the controversy over
like plato or karl-marx-stadt says that is not the case. tell us how they lock horns. >> it has to be one of the oldest debates with social science predating the idea there is but the hideous social forces explain human outcomes. . . >> it's all about biography. what i thought is these are two further apart view points. the problem is that both arguments make sense. the social scientists or the people following the tradition of, you know, not just marx, but most social scientists say, look, there's three reasons why leaders don't matter that much, that the leader of my organization faces external constraints. if you're the ceo of company, you have competitors. you can't set prices at whatever you want. there's internal constraints, tradition, culture, everything inside a country, company, military unit. you can't do whatever you want. most importantly, leaders are not chosen randomly so most leaders of powerful organizations, organizations that we care about, organizations that have the ability to reshape history, they are not picked out of a hat, but picked because that organiz
this opportunity to help us all steal back our votes. thank you very much. [applause] >>> for more information, visit the author's webs, gregpalst.com. >> conservative scholar presents thoughts on the obama presidency and what he deems are the, quote, "fatal contradictions, end quote, of liberalism. he speaks to the audience and answers questions for about an hour. >> good evening. i'm matthew spalding, vice president of american studies here at the american foundation. we're in for a treat. here we are, approaching election, pretends ton a water shed recognized by both political parties as a changes point, a change don't on the role of government, markets, and the future progeek story of the nation. in that debate, commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bites, daily reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily, for us, in the midst of this, a very serious thinker wrote a serious book. having been discovered by william f. buckley, reading and writing for "national review," having overcome education at harvard university -- [laughter] and upbringing in west virginia -- [laughter] charle
you in slightly less than 10 minutes. thanks for your patience. please stay with us and please thank our author, sally bedell smith. that was wonderful. >> we would like to hear from you. tweet as your feedback, twitter.com/booktv. >> this book is about liberals, not democrats, who are often not that much different from republicans in many respects. this book is dedicated to that peculiar brand of american who self identifies as a liberal, live life as a liberal and which is more of us in america were liberals, think michael more, think nancy pelosi, think your local college professor. think of the driver of that crazy car with all the bush is hitler bumper stickers on the back of the car. think the checkout help with the master's degree in gender studies wearing the head band at your local whole food store. you get the picture, right? they dominate professions that we've a very large cultural imprint in this great country profession like journalism, the arts, academia, the music industry, america's fastest growing band of entertainers, sec this l.a. acrobats. who are these peo
't be taken. rather it is playing with politics might give us cause. what is the history project about a second term for barack obama were he free elective with so few presidents having success in that time in office. one of the challenges that face those that have troubled or failed the second term and would allow others to succeed and can barack obama overcome these challenges if he is reelected to become a member of that select group of presidents the we did for the quagmire of the second term and somehow came through relatively unscathed? success in the second term doesn't imply that they're one of failures or significant stumbles. some even severe during that then venue but that time in office has the fulfillment of a significant number of the following measures of success. first, the president must provide defense against foreign or domestic threats. second of the president must retain or expand economic comfortable and more social opportunities. this becomes the primary challenge that the nation feels secure for a military threat. third, the president must effectively leave cong
danticat will be joining us for her most recent book, so spoke the earth. she is a haitian-american and she writes mostly about those issues. in a couple of hours, lori andrews, hanna rosin and joan walsh will be on the same panel life from chapman hall in miami-dade college for the miami book fair takes place. lori andrews book is called social networks and the death of privacy and hanna rosin, the end of men at bestseller and we feature her on her "after words" program and by the way hanna rosin will be joining us for an exclusive facebook chat so if you go to facebook.com/booktv and lycos, you can ask her questions about her book. she will be joining us after her panel for an exclusive facebook chat. joan walsh's book is called what's the matter with white people? after that, kissinger associates had david rothkopf will be joining us to talk about his most recent book, power incorporated. his first book was called superclass in another panel we will be covering includes candice millard writing about james garfield, david nassar writing about joseph kennedy and les standiford writing abou
on earth are we ever going to do so? so we see this is very as very important for the reelected u.s. administration and yes, he is right about the icc. that is what we are saying. we are not saying that anyone should he exempt from the icc for the long-term future. the negotiation has to succeed and everybody has to accept some things that are temporary or that are unpleasant. we have our own experience of that. many honorable members with the violent peace process. we had to do things that we were very reluctant to do but necessary to bring about a settlement. that is true in the middle east as well. schmidt are alumni along with joe biden. [applause] along with joe biden who has just been elected for a second term as vice president of the united states. [applause] together, they are the reason the university of delaware has been called the epicenter of politics. and since then another alumnist governor chris christie of new jersey has demonstrated his brand of politics based on reality whether than wishful thinking. he embraced president obama after hurricane sandy to the dismay o
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